Create a world of flavor from just ten spices

Fresh spices are the best spices.  But I’ll bet you have spices in your cupboard that have been there for longer than you can remember. Most likely, you bought them for a specific recipe and haven’t used them since.

It doesn’t make sense to have dozens of spice mixes gathering dust in the cupboard when you can create endless variety  with just a handful of foundational flavors.

I recently teamed up with McCormick Spice to create this fun infographic, showing how to create  a half dozen of today’s most popular flavor profiles using just ten basic spices. But the possibilities are endless!

Spice Recipe Poster

Make your own calcium-fortified cashew milk

In the ever expanding category of nondairy milk, cashew milk has become a favorite. Although soymilk is a closer match for cow’s milk in terms of protein, it does have that distinctive beany flavor. (Which I don’t find unpleasant…just pronounced.)

Cashew milk, on the other hand, has a much milder flavor. To my palate, at least, it is the most dairy-like in taste and mouth feel. It’s also–by far–the easiest nondairy milk to make yourself, which can save you big bucks. You can even add your own calcium and vitamin D!

Cashew milk is the easiest to make from scratch. No boiling, skimming, straining. Click To Tweet Continue reading “Make your own calcium-fortified cashew milk” >

Are decorative pumpkins and gourds edible?

pumpkins-1708769_640

Jessica writes:

“We just threw out the pumpkins we had on our porch as decoration, and it made me wonder whether we could have eaten them. I bought them at the grocery store after all! 

Can you eat/cook any type of pumpkin? (I had a mix of regular, Cinderella, and maybe Yokohama.) If you can eat them, how long after you put them on your porch will they be edible? I’ve only used canned pumpkin to date, is the process of making your own challenging?”

Continue reading “Are decorative pumpkins and gourds edible?” >

New Ways to Use Whey Protein Powder

imagesAfter writing about the benefits of distributing your protein intake more evenly throughout the day, I heard from many of you that you were struggling to figure out how to get the recommended 25 – 30 grams of protein at breakfast and lunch–without eating meat at every meal!

So, when National Dairy Council challenged me to come up with some novel ways to incorporate whey protein powder into familiar meals and recipes, I jumped at the chance.

Why Whey?

Although there are lots of options, each with pros and cons, my protein powder of choice has always been unflavored whey protein. It’s a high-quality protein, neutral in flavor, versatile, relatively inexpensive and–unlike some of the legume based protein powders I’ve tried–doesn’t cause digestive issues (read: gas!).  I keep a big container of it in the pantry but until recently I only used it in smoothies.

As I’ve discovered, there are so many other ways to use whey protein powder to increase protein intake throughout the day. Getting the recommended amount of protein should be a snap. Continue reading “New Ways to Use Whey Protein Powder” >